The rise of two saints and the demise of authority #JPII #JohnXXIII

April 27, 2014

Can this be me? Is it possible to be sticking up for the heavy-fisted oppressors of the meek. When that hamy hand falls hard, it hurts. When one is robbed of livelihood and reputation by the sinister forces that seem to control the means of survival, it is final. There is no human court of last resort. The wrongful verdict stands and the weak is brought low by the strong. The self-centered world of individual purgative is a garden of delights for the wealthy and well established, but lesser individuals just suck it up. That is why endorsing the notion of authority comes with all the comfort of a sudden leg cramp. This really hurts. One reason we hate authority is that it is so frequently abused.

For those of us who believe in the church, authority is an idea that is held up with the highest optimism. After all, the church is the body of Christ. It is his living presence in the world. Should the church not, therefore, behave itself with as much kindness as is possible when dealing with fallen humans? Should the church not be an example of justice properly understood and mercy for those who turn from evil? Instead, we find bishops devoted to covering up the criminal misdeeds of clerical child molesters. It is not just the Roman Catholics either. The female students at presumably orthodox evangelical schools are not safe from the lewd advances of professors, but these so-called Christian educators are secure from any hint of scandal. There will certainly be no real consequences for the sexually immoral instructors. And then there are the regular crooks and liars. Let us not forget the greedy! They all bring such shame upon the church.

God knows that the wheat grows amongst the tares until the day of judgment when angels will toss the bad ones into the flames of eternal damnation. The church is a very human organization. Sometimes, God must be completely speechless at what the disordered body parts of Christ are doing to his faithful people and the disrepute we bring upon him in society.

Much has already been said about the two newest arrivals in the heavenly court of officially designated saints. Perhaps they get smoking jackets and admission to an exclusive club. You know. It is something similar to the cool digs enjoyed by those who have several times hosted Saturday Night Live. These deceased bishops of Rome are probably good guys and deserve to be luxuriously rewarded. The question of the day is this; among all God’s people, could we have done better? Do John XXIII and John Paul II really set a fine example?

I am not a Roman Catholic and if you want to know what I think of the Church of Rome, check out the 39 Articles of Religion. Still, the Pope occupies an important role as the most important Christian in the western church. These two men have done a great deal of harm to the religious institutions. One may not believe in certain aspects of Roman doctrine (check the Articles!) but, darn it all, Christians need the Roman Catholic Church. Who else can muster an intellectual army that defines and defends our commonly held beliefs? There is no other similar international organization of believers.

John XXIII was wrong. There is no need to open the windows to worldly influences. The people of the church meet the world in everyday life and attests to the resurrection of Christ by the quality of their good works. The worship of the church is directed to the Almighty God who has made us all and became one of us so that we might be saved. Worship is about salvation. It has nothing whatever to do with how one feels, whether we enjoy the music, whether the sermon has satisfied the high standards of lay critics. The decline of Roman Catholic ceremonial is the first movement in the fall of Christianity.

Now, there is a distinction that must be made here. Ritual performed for its; own sake becomes mere entertainment and is meaningless. The Roman failure is not the use of ritual, but the inability or unwillingness to teach the meaning of liturgical worship. All of the little gestures mean something and have a historical context. Anglicans are equally as guilty of tearing down liturgical worship. Since Gregory Dix was an Anglican, my people may be more guilty. Dix took the liturgical movement forward into outright consumerism. The older rites of churches following ancient patterns were centered on the idea of salvation. The newer rites are centered on human experience of worship.

The concept of teaching authority is very much part of this conversation, first, because liturgy teaches theology and, second, liturgy reveals the dignity and respectability of the church. There is an unworldly quality to liturgy when it is correctly presented. This quality is what the world needs to approach the wicked influences that surround us. Liturgy is part of the active work of God on earth through the agency of the body of Christ. Genial John XXIII started the ball rolling on the destruction of his own ancient style of worship, and the subsequent harm done to the rest of Christianity.

And then there is JPII. He did much to change the world in a positive sense. Give him credit for going after the godless Commies. What a shame that his record is so marred by mediocre appointments and the criminal conspiracies to protect pedophiles. It may be that many will be thrilled by the elevation of these men, but no amount of spinning can conceal the sorry record of devaluing an essential expression of Christ’s presence.

 

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